Archiv für Februar, 2010

Finally the Audios for the Guiding Star versus City Lock Clash last week in Geneva are available to download.

(Just click the Flyer)

Konshens Mix CD, mixed by Daddy & Hypa, known for their fantastic remixes.

(Click Frontcover to download)

The Heatwave and Soundclash reminds me that, 2 days ago, the legendary Sleng Teng Riddim had its 25th Anniversary. Pretty awesome that this riddim still can mash up any dance/clash you go nowadays.

Read more about it in Beth Lessers excellent book “Dancehall – The Story of Jamaican Dancehall Culture”

The night of the 23rd, people began to gather on the Waltham early. The sounds were warming up with the apprentices while the big artists were arriving. Black Scorpio opened the showdown with the full compliment of Sassafras and Trees and regulars Shukahine, Culture Lee, Wayne Palmer, and Michael Jahsone. Jah Screw, the selector, was armed with dubplates by Frankie Paul (the Scorpio productions) like “The Closer I Get to You,” as well as Earl Sixteen’s “Sweet Soul Rockin,” and “Making Tracks,” Bobby Melody, Little John, and Johnny Osbourne. On Jammy’s side were John Wayne, Echo Minott, General Leon, Screecha Nice, Tullo T, Junior Reid, Tonto Irie, and Pompidou. Tupps was selecting with confidence knowing that he had a bag full of Sleng Teng to thrown down. Every name entertainer was there from U-Roy to Leroy Smart to witness the confrontation.

By nine o’clock the yard was full and more people were coming through the door. Scorpio was getting hot with Johnny Osbourne’s “Reasons” and “Show Me Your Sign.” After an hour, the current went over to Jammy. Wise Tupps opened right away with Sleng Teng and the crowd went wild! People were cheering and throwing their hands in the air, blowing noise-makers and whistles. The bass sound that was coming out of those boxes was like nothing that had ever been heard before. It was absolutely clean—powerful and pounding. It just stopped your heart. And it had all come out of a “music box,” as the unfamiliar electronic keyboards were referred to then. Tupps was putting on Sugar Minott’s “War and Crime” when suddenly the melody was interrupted by the entrance of armed police officers, M16s on their shoulders. For over an hour, the dance had to stop while police ordered everyone to the side as they searched each person, one by one, for weapons. John Wayne was heard to say something unacceptable about the police over the mike and was hauled off (he later returned intact).

Finally, after a luckily fruitless search, the officers retreated (with a few timid patrons) and the clash proceeded, but the verdict was already in—Sleng Teng had won the day. What was it about a chance combination on a tiny Casio keyboard that could mesmerise an entire nation and change forever the course of reggae music? Once this “Computer” rhythm appeared, there was no turning back. Even Jammy had to reluctantly shelve over fifty “human” rhythms he had made with the High Times band and not used yet, because no one wanted to hear them. All they wanted was Sleng Teng—literally. Album after album of pure Sleng Teng versions were released and every single one sold. It was Jammy’s very first number one record in Jamaica (although he had had several abroad). Yes, “the Sleng Teng dominate bad, bad,” as Tupps recalls.

Finally, after nearly a year, the War inna East Clash DVD from 2009 is ready to download!

HERBALIZE-IT BREAKING NEWS

After a constant string of unfortunate circumstances that were hindering the completion of this project, we at Herbalize-it can finally put the last nail in the coffin and announce that the War Ina East 2009 Europe vs USA – Gloves Off, Guns Out dvd is ready for release and can be now downloaded.

Our deepest, sincerest apologies to all the soundsytems that took part in this clash (Team USA – Poison Dart & TEK-9 and Team EUROPE – SENTINEL & SUPERSONIC) and ofcourse all the die-hard curious clash fans all over the world, that have been anxiously awaiting the release of this dvd to re-live this amazing night in European clash history. Thank you all for your patience and continued support, never loosing faith or trust in the belief that we would indeed get this dvd completed and accessible to you, totally free of charge.

The saying “every cloud has a silver lining” fits perfectly with this situation. The release of the dvd for the last edition of War Ina East, now comes hot on the heels of the new edition for this year, heightening the hype, excitement and anticipation for this inevitable classical battle. So people go download the dvd, enjoy it to the max and make sure to not keep it to yourself!”

Part 1
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=4XGK0P27
Part 2
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=EJ856ZDQ
Part 3
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=JPIFH4AS
Part 4
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=JC4RZRDF

Big up Sultan and the whole HERBALIZE- IT Family for making this possible!

Nice little HipHop Tune by Elly Ess & Supah Shane with a Jamaican Flavour, Brooklyn footage, Jabba & Bobby Cameo plus Shinehead Vox on the Chorus.

This documentary was screened at a few film-festivals during the last year, but me kinda slept on it.

About Rise Up:
Thinking of Jamaica usually conjures up an image of peace-loving Rastafarians with thick dreadlocks surrounded by even thicker clouds of hash smoke who play reggae tunes and sing the praises of Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie.

Luciano Blotta’s self-conscious documentary Rise Up provides ample support of that cliché, but he simultaneously shows that behind the clever export product that reggae has become, a world of poverty and underdevelopment is lurking. In the minds of many young Jamaicans, the only way out is a career in music, but the competition is overwhelming, so everyone tries to display their talent wherever and whenever they can.

Blotta follows three young people who are trying to rise up from the underground: there’s the shy Kemoy, who sings beautiful R&B-like songs; the white Ice, whose biggest dream is to perform at the famous Reggae Sumfest; and the charismatic Turbulence, who almost ended up living a life of crime before he thought better of it.

These days, Turbulence’s goal is to “Eat good food, have good life, make music.” Blotta interweaves the three storylines with lots of music (watch out for the guy with the one-stringed guitar), atmospheric shots of the city and country, and the commentary, which is spoken in juicy Jamaican English by a trio of experts from the music world. Sly and Robbie stop by, as well as the legendary Lee Perry, to say that Kemoy has a lot of talent. But apparently talent alone isn’t enough not by a long shot.

Just got the Audios for the Kill or Die Trying Clash 2010 from the Promoter General Chiancone via Facebook.

Go check the clash.